Believe it or not, there was a time radio listening was nearly as cool as binge-watching Netflix.

Pockets of listeners around the city would congregate around a radio as early as 6 am and drool over hours of audio-based content that was as addictive as cream covered Oreos.

And smack in the middle of the audio revolution was everybody’s favorite radio station, Lagos-based Cool FM. The radio station was basically driving a new wave of listeners that were being courted by a new entrant to the Nigerian radio ecosystem – Dan Foster.

Dan Foster was, for lack of a better word, cut from a different mould, with his eclectic delivery and out-of-the-box show ideas that were as hilarious as they were magnetic.

Before Dan Foster, radio OAPs had well-rehearsed, stitched voice deliveries that were as inauthentic as Nigerian honey, yet no one were really bothered about them until Dan happened.

Dan Foster had a down-to-earth honest approach to radio presenting that drew people to him in droves. It was like having a heart-to-heart conversation with a friend as opposed to the disconnected, well-oiled voice of the average radio presenter.

Name-calling blunders were commonplace with Dan and brought with it a charm that we just couldn’t get over. No Nigerian name escaped Dan’s epic pronunciation massacre, except of course one of his favorite words, ‘Ikebe,’ which he somehow managed to call over and over on radio without any form of regulation backlash.

Dan Foster single-handedly introduced the ‘call a listener’ type shows that soon became a regular with the rest of the Nigerian OAPs that managed to garner some sort of listenership in the midst of Dan’s overwhelming reign of the early 2000s.

For a radio presenter who had worked with a few American radio stations before making an unexpected move to Africa, Dan Foster was overly excited about Nigerian music and did nothing to hide it. He was instrumental in giving heavy radio play to budding music groups like Styl Plus and Infinity, amongst others because if Dan Foster liked your sound, he celebrated it.

And because Dan Foster was the biggest thing on radio, whoever ‘The Big Dawg’ saw as worthy to be ‘radio deified’ was who other radio presenters celebrated too. 

One of Dan’s most adorable traits was his sincere love for music. For Dan, the artiste was not as important as the art. So he would play any good song regardless of whether it was done by a famous artiste or not.

Many fast-rising artistes who had never even set eyes on Dan Foster got serious air play, just by sending in their songs.

Dan Foster single-handedly set the pace for the new crop of radio presenters who flooded the scene, only after Dan had broken all the rules and made radio cool.

It is often said that it is impossible for one man to single-handedly build an empire, but Dan Foster proved everyone wrong. He built an empire of talk with just a few quirky vocal cues and a voice of gold.

RIP Big Dawg. 

Believe it or not, there was a time radio listening was nearly as cool as binge-watching Netflix.

Pockets of listeners around the city would congregate around a radio as early as 6 am and drool over hours of audio-based content that was as addictive as cream covered Oreos.

And smack in the middle of the audio revolution was everybody’s favorite radio station, Lagos-based Cool FM. The radio station was basically driving a new wave of listeners that were being courted by a new entrant to the Nigerian radio ecosystem – Dan Foster.

Dan Foster was, for lack of a better word, cut from a different mould, with his eclectic delivery and out-of-the-box show ideas that were as hilarious as they were magnetic.

Before Dan Foster, radio OAPs had well-rehearsed, stitched voice deliveries that were as inauthentic as Nigerian honey, yet no one were really bothered about them until Dan happened.

Dan Foster had a down-to-earth honest approach to radio presenting that drew people to him in droves. It was like having a heart-to-heart conversation with a friend as opposed to the disconnected, well-oiled voice of the average radio presenter.

Name-calling blunders were commonplace with Dan and brought with it a charm that we just couldn’t get over. No Nigerian name escaped Dan’s epic pronunciation massacre, except of course one of his favorite words, ‘Ikebe,’ which he somehow managed to call over and over on radio without any form of regulation backlash.

Dan Foster single-handedly introduced the ‘call a listener’ type shows that soon became a regular with the rest of the Nigerian OAPs that managed to garner some sort of listenership in the midst of Dan’s overwhelming reign of the early 2000s.

For a radio presenter who had worked with a few American radio stations before making an unexpected move to Africa, Dan Foster was overly excited about Nigerian music and did nothing to hide it. He was instrumental in giving heavy radio play to budding music groups like Styl Plus and Infinity, amongst others because if Dan Foster liked your sound, he celebrated it.

And because Dan Foster was the biggest thing on radio, whoever ‘The Big Dawg’ saw as worthy to be ‘radio deified’ was who other radio presenters celebrated too. 

One of Dan’s most adorable traits was his sincere love for music. For Dan, the artiste was not as important as the art. So he would play any good song regardless of whether it was done by a famous artiste or not.

Many fast-rising artistes who had never even set eyes on Dan Foster got serious air play, just by sending in their songs.

Dan Foster single-handedly set the pace for the new crop of radio presenters who flooded the scene, only after Dan had broken all the rules and made radio cool.

It is often said that it is impossible for one man to single-handedly build an empire, but Dan Foster proved everyone wrong. He built an empire of talk with just a few quirky vocal cues and a voice of gold.

RIP Big Dawg. 

And although we weren’t ready to let go of you, it’s probably time to make some waves in radio heaven.

And although we weren’t ready to let go of you, it’s probably time to make some waves in radio heaven.

This article was written by Henri ‘Yireconnect on Instagram with him here

Leave a Reply