A few good things can be attributed to the COVID-19 lockdown of 2020, and the emergence of content creators who had been overshadowed before is one of them. So many creatives came to the spotlight during that period, some driven by boredom to suddenly realize their creative talents, others who had been on the scene for a while, suddenly getting noticed, owing largely to their persistence and perseverance. Oladimeji Ajegbile, popularly known as Dimeji, belongs to the latter. He had been creating content for a long time, but finally, in 2020, he broke out and began to receive the recognition that he deserved. Oladimeji Ajegbile is a Christian creative, content creator, and podcaster, and he recently added influencer to his resume.

Before diving into his life as a creative director and influencer, let’s take a trip to his earlier years and see how he came to be a content creator.

Dimeji is an alumnus of Bells University of Technology, Ota, graduating with a Bachelor of Science with a major in Architecture as well as a Postgraduate Degree (MSc) in Architecture. He had always enjoyed creative expression, and his architectural background gave him a head start in learning about graphic and visual design. After practising the basics of architecture and design in the first year of architecture school, he discovered some graphic design tools, namely Photoshop and Illustrator, and he started using them to make art, flyers, and other graphic design products. He continued as a designer for another 6 years, working with religious organizations, startups, and a few micro-enterprises, crafting beautiful brand identity experiences that meet users’ needs and business goals while studying to become a professional architect. 

“My transition from architecture to a more expressive and creative lifestyle came eight years later after I quit my 9-5 job as a Junior Architect and went all out with sharing the things I’ve experienced and learned as a graphic designer with over eight years of work experience. I started making videos and other forms of content to communicate these things to a small audience on Instagram and YouTube, which has kept me going till now.”

Fast forward to the present, Dimeji has established himself as one of the content creators worth his salt and is currently a full-time creative. We wanted to know, as we’re sure you do as well, what he did in 2020 to change his lot and bring him into the limelight. He responds, “I started creating content because I wanted to transfer the knowledge I had learnt and experienced over the years and to help other young and emerging creatives grow and be better. My intention wasn’t to make money or earn from creating content, and I think this helped because I know if I was creating for money, I would have stopped or quit when I wasn’t getting any results.”

Besides that, I didn’t do anything differently except that I became more intentional with what I created. I have always created without taking breaks, which helped me stay consistent. I understood early on that to make an impact in a saturated space, I needed to keep at it and be there longer than others.

I’d also say dedication, consistency, and perseverance helped me a lot.”

A major distinguishing factor that Dimeji has is that he creates the majority of his content from his bedroom/workspace. It’s like a one-man show, that never gets old or boring. You would think that because he shoots videos in his room, the videos would look shabby, but that’s not the case for Dimeji. His videos are well crafted and professionally done. We just had to know his secret to accomplishing this.

“I’ve always produced video content with my smartphone and I followed a lot of professional video creators, so I understood perfectly what makes videos look great. However, in 2020, during the lockdown, I decided to up my video creation game by learning more and I decided to do a video editing and creation challenge, so I embarked on a 100-day Premiere Pro challenge.

For the 100 days, I successfully used Premiere Pro every day and produced 171 videos, including over 100 short videos, which I uploaded to TikTok and Instagram simultaneously. After the challenge, I started making more high-quality content on my social media.

The tools I use merely support the things I create. The foundation of my professional and well-crafted content is my undying hunger to never stop learning and improving.”

As a faith-based creative, his Christian faith inspires the majority of his ideas and the content he creates. While studying the Bible, the stories reform in his mind and become everyday lessons that he can share with his audience. He is also inspired to create by his previous experiences, what he has learned, what he is currently going through, and what he is still learning.

A common worry with most content creators is the feeling that their audience may not like certain content they create, even though they love it. Speaking on this, Dimeji says that he has found over the years that not everyone will like his content and that not every piece of content he creates will perform well. He said knowing this helped him shift his focus away from the worry of whether or not people would like it, and it encouraged him to create what he truly enjoyed and put it out there with no expectations. “I’m okay as long as I enjoy it.”

His creative focus is on the wellbeing of other creatives, and here’s why: “I believe that creativity emerges from a place that’s beyond the physical, a place that allows you to be who you are, the mind. If this part of us isn’t taken care of, we can’t be as creative as we should be.

I understand that a lifestyle is made up of many things, so I focused on the aspects that my focus on wellbeing for creatives aims to impact. I believe that an informed point of view on overall wellbeing will result in a holistic lifestyle, allowing my audience to tap into their creative potential. Through the categories I explore, I help my audience define their creative point of view by offering productivity tips, content, and community.

I believe when creatives Live Well, Think Well, Rest Well, and Eat Well, there’s a better chance of being more creative and getting better results.

Dimeji has recently begun working with brands as an influencer, and as a Christian creative with a distinct voice in content creation, it must be critical for him to maintain the integrity of his brand and not lose sight of its message when collaborating with other brands. In response to this, he says, “I made it a point to be open and honest with my audience, so I don’t work with just any brand.

Before agreeing to any collaboration with a brand, I always want to use or become acquainted with the product or service, especially if it involves sharing and recommending it to others. I believe it is unethical to recommend something I have never used or know nothing about to my audience, and I am not comfortable doing so.

It’s easy to do it for the money, but one’s reputation is far more important, and I care deeply about my audience and would never do or be involved in anything that would cause me to lose them.”

Moving on from his journey to becoming a content creator to how he actually creates content, Dimeji takes us through his creative space and thought process.

Coming up with content ideas is almost like second nature to him. He has learnt to simplify his content creation process by documenting more of his daily thoughts and things that cross his mind, which helps him have more to produce without thinking too much. He uses Google Keep to document his thoughts and make his ideas accessible. He also owns a whiteboard in his workspace that he uses to perform a brain dump every night. He always writes out the thoughts in his head or mind before going to bed. This exercise helps him go to bed with very little to think about and wake up with a board filled with ideas worth creating.

Most content creators advise the use of a content calendar to plan, but Dimeji does it differently. Here’s his response to how he plans his content: “I’m what I’ll call a spontaneous planner. I understand the place of planning as a creative, but I also understand that the best creative expressions often come unplanned or as a spur of the moment, so yes, I plan my content, but not with a calendar. I plan using blocks of time.

Block of time planning works like this: Every week I have a topic of content focus, and anything I create that week must address or link to the content focus for the week.

Moving on from his journey to becoming a content creator to how he actually creates content, Dimeji takes us through his creative space and thought process.

Coming up with content ideas is almost like second nature to him. He has learnt to simplify his content creation process by documenting more of his daily thoughts and things that cross his mind, which helps him have more to produce without thinking too much. He uses Google Keep to document his thoughts and make his ideas accessible. He also owns a whiteboard in his workspace that he uses to perform a brain dump every night. He always writes out the thoughts in his head or mind before going to bed. This exercise helps him go to bed with very little to think about and wake up with a board filled with ideas worth creating.

Most content creators advise the use of a content calendar to plan, but Dimeji does it differently. Here’s his response to how he plans his content:” I’m what I’ll call a spontaneous planner. I understand the place of planning as a creative, but I also understand that the best creative expressions often come unplanned or as a spur of the moment, so yes, I plan my content, but not with a calendar. I plan to use blocks of time.

Block of time planning works like this: Every week I have a topic of content focus, and anything I create that week must address or link to the content focus for the week.”

In regards to his creative process, here’s what he has to say.

My creative process is very flexible. I am very expressive and I love to keep my ideas documented, so I don’t have to think too much when it’s time to execute. However, my work process looks something like this: I go through my Google Keep entries to see what ideas are worth sharing that day, then I do a quick research online to understand the idea a little more, which then pushes me to rewrite my content the way I want it, and finally, I produce the content and share it.

We wanted to know his answer would be to this question would be. What would be your response if someone asked you how I could start creating videos in my room as you do?

Get your smartphone, position it close to a window, and record yourself. Then watch it over and over and then ask yourself, “Is this something I’d like if someone else created it?” If the answer is yes, then you’re good to go, but if it’s no, go over the video again and see how you can improve. Don’t wait until you have the best tools before you start. Start with what you have. “

Dimeji’s favourite apps for creating content on his phone are InShot and Canva, and on his PC, Premiere Pro and Adobe Illustrator. And he says the most important tools a contemporary creator needs are:

  • Good lighting (a window will do, a ring light is a plus)
  • A room with light-painted walls (white or beige)
  • A table or elevated platform (a tripod is a plus)
  • A physical notepad to document ideas
  • A digital space to save videos and trending sounds
  • A text-based app (Canva, Over, Adobe Spark)
  • A video editor (InShot, CapCut, Premiere Rush)
  • A list of favourite creators to stalk and learn from.
  • A CAN-DO attitude

When he’s not busy making other people lives better with his content, he enjoys good food, exploring new restaurants, watching movies, and travelling.

These are some tips and tricks he’s learnt on his journey.

  1. Stop letting your potential go to waste because you don’t feel confident or ready enough. People with half your talent are making serious waves while you’re still waiting to feel ready.
  2. Discipline, consistency, and persistence will take you places your motivation can never get you to.
  3. Until you possess the ability to simplify your ideas and thoughts without losing any quality or value, you’ll still struggle to produce your best work.

Too busy to visit our blog every day? We get it! Subscribe to our weekly newsletter and get our best stories delivered to your mailbox every Friday!

2 Comments

Leave a Reply