Entry 7: Gold Chains and Paper Bound Slaves

“Now, godliness with contentment is great gain”
1 Timothy 6:6 (NKJV)

There is no amount of money that can buy contentment.

Some years back, the internet went berserk over Jose Mujica, the former President of Uruguay. The media called him the poorest President because he drove an old Volkswagen beetle, lived in a farmhouse and had a pay less than one percent of the earnings of our Senators, or even Local Government Chairmen (I exaggerate). He had a life-changing ideology, one that would later form part of the framework of how I would later base my idea of wealth.

I remember just after the Presidential election results were announced and President Muhammadu Buhari was deemed to be re-elected by popular vote. A lot of youths took to the streets of Twitter, almost the same way many of them supposedly voted, to insult our countrymen from the North.

Of the thousands of tweets insulting their fellow countrymen, who should be able to exercise free will and vote their candidate of choice (a notion that the twitter guys seem to agree with), there was one common theme which could roughly be put as “na dem poor pass, na dem e go still affect pass”. Besides the blatant foolishness of such commentary, I began to wonder, “are the Northerners really poor?”


What do you really need?

What do you need to live a fulfilled life?

How many clothes do you need?

How much food can you eat?

I read somewhere that it would take Bill Gates multiple lifetimes to squander his fortune if he spent about a million dollars everyday. The question is, how much does he really need to survivor?

Does Davido need the thirty billion in his bank account to live his best life?

How much money would make you feel better about yourself?

Why do you need that car, house or smartphone?

Why do you need to buy that amount of data?

Why is Instagram that important?

Who are you trying to impress?


No, maybe the Northerners are not really poor. Yes, a higher percentage of them could be illiterate but they have no need to wake up at ungodly hours to chase money. They need to buy very few things. The things we have come to see as necessities are not necessary to them, hence, they lead a simpler and I daresay healthier life.

I have come to the conclusion, that many of us are not poor, we are just pursuing more stuff.
This would explain why many rich people suffer from chronic depression. The downside to having a lot of money, is that it could give you problems money can’t solve.

When last were you grateful for what you had?


“I know we own things we don’t need to impress people we don’t know
then we go broke trying to look rich
i can’t do it, i just won’t”

– Andy mineo, Never Land



This article was written by Ogbe Oritsemisan; connect with him on IG here 

9 thoughts on “Entry 7: Gold Chains and Paper Bound Slaves

  1. This is really deep, expands on the thought on what really makes a human being, what’s in their heart or what’s in their pocket. Good work.

    Reply
  2. I totally agree with you.
    Really what do we need to be happy and content? It is an individual perspective or perception, false life style just to please people or feel “among” About time we faced reality put money where neccessary.

    Reply
  3. I did my tertiary education in the north then and their lifestyle was no doubt simple but that simplicity have been replaced by a monstrous lifestyle ‘terrorism ‘ by a few of them which is rubbing off on that well acclaimed ‘simplicity’.
    This is my own thought.

    Reply

Post Comment