Entry 13: Different Strokes For Different Folks

Music is something that I love. I may not play any instrument, I may sound like a dying camel in the shower when I sing, I may not know the lyrics of most songs, but I love music. The problem is that I listen to the wrong type of music to most people. It’s either the song I listen to is too loud, too explicit, too incomprehensible or just plain boring. I am usually the punching bag when it comes to the topic of music, and I know it seems childish and a bit immature but when someone insults the type of music I listen to I feel personally assaulted. It feels as if I opened up to the person about my feelings and hopes and they just look at it and are like “Nope sorry, not interested.”

I remember when I let a friend of mine listen to what I had playing on my device, It was FKA Twigs. Her voice emits a sort of eerie calm which is both strange foreign and inviting all at the same time, or so I thought. After listening to it for five seconds, he declared it not up to par with his standards and walked away. I was angry. I had just discovered her and was keen on having her art appreciated by others, but after that encounter I kept to myself when it came to music.

Later on in the semester I saw my friend dancing to Felila Ketan and I realized that as people differ so do their tastes. It’s not as if I didn’t know that before, but the range at which the difference is based on is amazing. But sometimes the gap between the two is not so much.

People usually reel on me for not liking Nigerian music or that I like ‘white people music’, which could be called narrow-minded because I listen to R ‘n’ B and Rap, not only to alternative music.

For example the alté scene is something I can get with. The creativity and vibe that comes along with the great vocal talent is something I can get with. From the sounds chilled afro beat feel of WurlD, the visual representation that Santi delivers in his videos to the sound of Odunsi the Engine all of whom are placed under the alté movement.

I’m only mentioning the alté because I feel it is the least liked; maybe not in terms of sound but representation. People seem to dislike what the alté brings to the table. Much like Rock ‘n’ Roll and Rap it is not liked and the people who do like it are teased or made fun of.

To that I say, the world doesn’t move to the beat of one drum, once you find your beat stick with it. It may take two to tango, but only one person is needed for the shaku.


This article was written by Chiekeziem Augustine Ezeh; connect with him on IG here 

Post Comment