Dangote Is Not A Musician But He’s A ‘god’ To Money Racking Musicians

Burna Boy proves that musicians are only small gods and there are public figures out there that have never been in the booth or even spread vocals on instrumentals, worth idolizing.

Burna Boy’s ”Dangote” follows the track in which Nigerian singers find themselves in the trains of millionaires, invoking insecurities of the music industry which is worth more than eighty million dollars ($80M).

Contrary to popular opinion about artists carting away large bags, deposits after tours and shows, it’s becoming more vivid by the day that Nigerian artists will never get to the level where their foreign contemporaries lie – earning mouth-watering cheques, royalties, endorsements and sponsorships.

Burna Boy soulful delivery has made him the spokesman for his colleagues who admire the effort of the Nigerian millionaires and strive to be wealthier or be in their level as he echoed in the chorus to ‘Dangote’ :

Dangote Dangote/Dangote still dey find money o/I no dey, I no dey/I no dey sleep on the money o/Who I be?/Who I be?/Wey make I no go find money o/I no dey send anybody o/Me I dey hustle gan gan

When wealth and affluence are infused in Afrobeats, hits are made, all thanks to Otedola and Dangote. Dice Ailes would be one of the recipients of this tradition when his single ”Otedola” became a national hit in 2017 referencing the rich man in his introduction and chorus to the Pop song:  ”……….. I be Otedola with the money oh ”

An accomplishing reference to this hypothesis is the Nigerian sweetheart and songstress, Teni, chorusing Dangote and Adeleke’s name in her hit, ”Case”. Teni’s song explains her love and feelings but her class still portrays the money as a frantic condition.

” …….Cause my papa no be Dangote or Adeleke but we go dey ok yea yea/But my papa no be Dangote or Adeleke but we go dey ok yea yea ” , she sings in admiration of the unidentified lover.”

Our Nigerian musicians will always familiarize with the money and others that earn more than them and it’s a dilemma that the industry still remains a swarm for rapacious music executives.

This article was written by Alex Ndace; he tweets via @AlexNdace

Post Comment